Discuss with You: Definition, Meaning, and Origin

Last Updated on
October 12, 2023

The idiom "discuss with you" means talking to someone about a topic, issue, or problem. It implies that the speaker wants to converse with the listener and exchange opinions, ideas, or information.

In short:

  • "Discuss with you" means to talk to someone about something.
  • It can imply a conversation, an exchange, or a persuasion.

What Does "Discuss with You" Mean?

The phrase "discuss with you" as an idiom refers to conversing with someone about a specific subject, issue, or concern. It conveys the speaker's intent to engage in a dialogue with the listener, facilitating the exchange of viewpoints, thoughts, or information. Furthermore, this idiom can indicate that the speaker seeks to sway, persuade, or negotiate with the listener regarding a particular matter.

Where Does "Discuss with You" Come From?

The origin of the idiom "discuss with you" is unclear, but it may be related to the Latin word "discutere," which means to shake, scatter, or examine. The term "discuss" entered the English language in the 14th century, pointing to determine by argument or debate. Later, it also acquired the meaning of talking over or conferring.

10 Examples of "Discuss with You" in Sentences

Here are some examples of how to use this idiom in sentences:

  • Yoink. We have nothing more to discuss with you. Goodbye!
  • Yes, please. I want to discuss with you the upcoming project timeline.
  • Let's discuss with you the options for improving customer satisfaction.
  • Can we discuss with you the potential risks associated with this decision?
  • No worries. Can we sit down and discuss with you our marketing strategy?
  • Real talk: It's essential to discuss with you the proposed changes to the website.
  • Is everything okay? Let's discuss with you the budget allocation for this quarter.
  • Good riddance. I want to discuss with you the training program for our new hires.
  • How you feeling? We need to discuss with you the team's performance at the meeting.
  • Hello! I want to check with you. May I discuss with you the details of our travel plans?

Examples of "Discuss with You" in Pop Culture

Here are some examples of how this idiom has been used in various forms of pop culture:

  • In The Godfather (1972), Don Vito Corleone tells Virgil Sollozzo: "I'm sorry. I must refuse your generous offer. But I'll be happy to discuss any other matter with you."
  • In Game of Thrones, Tyrion Lannister often uses the phrase "I would like to discuss this with you" when he wants a private discussion about strategies or political alliances.
  • In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2003), Professor Umbridge says to Harry: "I have something rather urgent to discuss with you."
  • In the movie Avengers: Endgame, Captain America says, "I need to discuss something with you," when he gathers the Avengers to plan their mission to retrieve the Infinity Stones.

Other Ways to Say "Discuss with You"

Here are some synonyms for this idiom:

  • Talk to you
  • Speak to you
  • Chat with you
  • Argue with you
  • Confer with you
  • Debate with you
  • Consult with you
  • Converse with you
  • Communicate with you

10 Frequently Asked Questions About "Discuss With You"

Here are some frequently asked questions about this idiom:

  • What does "discuss with you" mean?

The idiom "discuss with you" means talking to someone about a topic, issue, or problem. It implies that the speaker wants to converse with the listener and exchange opinions, ideas, or information.

  • What is the origin of the phrase "discuss with you"?

The origin of the idiom "discuss with you" is unclear, but it may be related to the Latin word "discutere," which means to shake, scatter, or examine. The term "discuss" entered the English language in the 14th century, pointing to determine by argument or debate.

  • What are some synonyms for "discuss with you"?

Some synonyms for this idiom are "talk to you," "speak with you," "chat with you," "argue with you," "confer with you," "debate with you," "consult with you," and "communicate with you."

  • What is the difference between "discuss with you" and "talk to you"?

The difference is that "discuss with you" implies a more serious, formal, or focused conversation, while "talk to you" can be casual, informal, or general.

  • How do you use "discuss with you" in a polite way?

To use "discuss with you" in a polite way, you can add words or phrases that show respect, courtesy, or consideration, such as "please," thank you," "if you don't mind," "when you have time," etc.

  • How do you respond to someone who says, "I need to discuss something with you"?

To respond to someone who says, "I need to discuss something with you," you can either express your willingness or readiness to have the discussion or ask for more information or clarification about the topic or the urgency of the debate.

  • How do you say "no" to someone who wants to "discuss something with you"?

To say "no" to someone who wants to discuss something with you, you can either decline politely or firmly, depending on the situation and the relationship. You can also give a reason or an alternative for your refusal.

  • How do you end a "discussion with someone"?

To end a discussion with someone, you can either summarize the main points or outcomes of the conversation, thank them for their participation or contribution, or suggest a follow-up action or communication.

  • How do you start a "discussion with someone"?

To start a discussion with someone, you can introduce yourself and the topic, ask an open-ended question or an opinion about the issue, or make a statement or observation inviting a response.

  • How do you improve your "discussion" skills?

You can do some research or preparation before the discussion, so you have some background knowledge and facts to support your arguments or opinions. In addition, you should acknowledge and address different or opposing views, and try to find common ground or compromise, rather than dismissing or attacking them.

Final Thoughts About "Discuss With You"

The idiom "discuss with you" is a common way of expressing the intention or desire to converse with someone about a particular topic, issue, or problem. It can imply different purposes or tones, such as exchange, persuasion, negotiation, or argument.

In summary:

  • It means to talk to someone about something.
  • It originated from the Latin word "discutere," pointing to shake, scatter, or examine.
  • It can be used in formal or informal contexts, and different objects can follow it.
  • It has been used in various forms of pop culture, such as movies, TV shows, books, and songs.
  • It has some synonyms, antonyms, and related expressions.

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