Send Over: Definition, Meaning, and Origin

Last Updated on
August 18, 2023

The idiom "send over" means instructing or directing someone to go to another place, usually for a specific purpose or task. In addition, it can also refer to dispatching or delivering something to another person or business, usually by mail, courier, or electronic means.

In short:

"Send over" means to order someone to go somewhere or to send something to someone.

What Does "Send Over" Mean?

The idiom "send over" can have two different meanings. One meaning is to tell someone to go somewhere else, usually for a specific reason or job. Another definition is to send something to someone else, usually by post, delivery service, or online.

Where Does "Send Over" Come From?

The idiom "send over" is derived from the combination of the verb "send" and the adverb "over" that comes from Old English. The earliest recorded use of this idiom dates back to the 14th century when it was used to send someone across the sea or through the air.

Historical Example

"And said, ‘O lord! May you prosper yourself, Look! I this child to you send over right here; And may her heart guide you as she wishes!"

— an excerpt from the poem "Troilus and Criseyde" by Geoffrey Chaucer in 1385

10 Examples of "Send Over" in Sentences

Here are some examples of how the idiom "send over" can be used in different sentences:

  • Can you please send over the report by tomorrow morning? Thanks so much!
  • They sent over a pizza for us as a thank-you gift, and we couldn't ask for more.
  • She sent him over to help us with the project. He has been our stand-up guy ever since.
  • He sent over some flowers and chocolates for her birthday. The sky is the limit to his generosity.
  • I couldn't be happier when they sent me to London for a training course.
  • My bad, I haven't told you. She sent over an email with the details of the meeting.
  • Seem like the boss is going to send you over to the other team. All the best to you!
  • That sucks. She sent him over the edge with her constant nagging in life.
  • Are you going to send him over for the case? He has all the bells and whistles of a good detective.
  • For your sake, you must do a better job, or I will send you over to another department.

Examples of "Send Over" in Pop Culture

The idiom "send over" is also used in various forms of pop culture, such as movies, TV shows, songs, and books.

Here are some examples of how it appears in pop culture:

  • In the movie "The Godfather" (1972), Don Corleone says to Tom Hagen: "Send over some food for my son. He's starving."
  • In the TV show "Friends" (1994-2004), Joey says to Chandler: "Send over some women. And not your mom."
  • In the song "I'm Yours" (2008) by Jason Mraz, he sings: "Send me over, send me away."

Other Ways to Say "Send Over"

Here are some synonyms and alternative expressions for "send over":

  • Send across
  • Send along
  • Send by
  • Send through
  • Send to
  • Dispatch
  • Delivery
  • Forward
  • Transfer
  • Transmit

10 Frequently Asked Questions About "Send Over"

Here are some common questions and answers about the idiom "send over":

  • What does "send over" mean?

The idiom "send over" means instructing or directing someone to go to another place, usually for a specific purpose or task.

  • What is the origin of "send over"?

The idiom "send over" is derived from the combination of the verb "send" and the adverb "over" that comes from Old English.

  • What are some synonyms for "send over"?

Some synonyms for "send over" are send across, send along, send though, deliver, transfer, transmit.

  • What is the difference between "send over" and "send out"?

"Send over" means to send something or someone to a specific person or place, while "send out" means to send something or someone to multiple people or places, usually for a general purpose or distribution.

Example: I will "send over" the invoice to you. / I will "send out" the invitations to everyone.

  • What is the difference between "send over" and "send back"?

"Send over" means to send something or someone to another person or place for the first time or as a new action. In contrast, "send back" means to return something or someone to the original person or business, usually because of a problem or dissatisfaction.

Example: He "sent over" a new laptop for me. / He "sent back" the laptop because it was broken.

  • What is the difference between "send over" and "bring over"?

"Send over" means to send something or someone to another person or place by mail, courier, or electronic means. On the other hand, "bring over" means to carry or transport something or someone to another person or place personally or physically.

Example: She "sent over" some photos by email. / She "brought over" some cookies when she visited.

  • Can you use "send over" in a question?

Yes, you can use "send over" in a question, usually to request or ask for something or someone to be sent to you or another person or place.

Example: Can you "send over" the contract for me to sign?

  • Can you use "send over" in a negative sentence?

Yes, you can use "send over" in a negative sentence, usually to refuse or deny something or someone to be sent to you or another person or place.

Example: They didn’t "send over" anyone competent enough.

  • Can you use "send over" in an imperative sentence?

Yes, you can use "send over" in an imperative sentence, usually to give an order or command for something or someone to be sent.

Example: "Send over" the files right now!

  • Can you use "send over" in a passive voice sentence?

Yes, you can use "send over" in a passive voice sentence, usually to emphasize the thing or person that is being sent rather than the sender.

Example: The documents were "sent over" by courier.

Final Thoughts About "Send Over"

The idiom "send over" is a common and helpful expression with different meanings depending on the context and situation.

To summarize:

  • "Send over" means to order someone to go somewhere or to send something to someone.
  • It originated from combining the verb "send" and the adverb "over," indicating movement or transfer from one place or person to another.
  • The idiom can be used in various sentences: questions, negatives, passives, past tense, future tense, imperatives, and exclamations.

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