Wind Me Up: Definition, Meaning, and Origin

Last Updated on
October 12, 2023

The idiom "wind me up" can have different meanings depending on the context. It can mean to annoy or upset someone, to say untrue things to trick someone, or to make someone crazy, angry, or energetic.

In short:

  • "Wind me up" can mean to annoy, upset, trick, or excite someone.

What Does "Wind Me Up" Mean?

The phrase "wind me up" can have different meanings depending on the context.

Here are some of the possible meanings and related expressions:

  • To annoy or upset someone. This meaning implies that someone deliberately provokes or irritates another person, making them angry or frustrated. For example, "He always winds me up with his sarcastic comments." A related expression is "get on someone's nerves."
  • To say untrue things to trick someone. This meaning implies that someone is joking or lying to another person, making them believe something incorrect. For example, "She was just winding me up when she said she won the lottery." A related expression is "pull someone's leg."
  • To make someone crazy, angry, or energetic. This meaning implies that someone is causing another person to lose control of their emotions or actions, making them act irrationally or impulsively. For example, "The loud music winds me up and makes me want to dance." A related expression is "work someone up."

Where Does "Wind Me Up" Come From?

The origin of the idiom "wind me up" is not clear, but it may be related to winding up a piece of yarn or a clock. In the past, clocks had to be wound up before they worked. One would make it run faster and louder by winding it up. Similarly, winding up a person would make them more agitated or excited.

10 Examples of "Wind Me Up" in Sentences

Here are some examples of how this idiom can be used in different sentences:

  • He winds me up by treating me to coffee, which I love.
  • What can I say? He winds me up by playing loud music at 3 a.m.
  • Real talk: He always makes fun of my accent, which winds me up.
  • No diggity. He knows how to wind me up with his political opinions.
  • Quite frankly, are you serious? Or are you just trying to wind me up?
  • Son of a biscuit. He winds me up by leaving his dirty dishes in the sink.
  • He was trying to wind me up by saying he scored better than me. Yoink.
  • Oh, snap. I can't stand his constant complaining. It winds me up so much.
  • Kack. She winds me up every time she borrows my clothes without asking.
  • For God's sake. Her nagging winds me up. I wish she could be more appreciative.

Examples of "Wind Me Up" in Pop Culture

Here are some examples of how this idiom has appeared in various forms of pop culture:

  • In the movie "The Hangover" (2009)4, Alan says: "Don't let the beard fool you. He's a child! And don't wind him up! That's what sets him off."
  • In the TV show "Friends" (1994-2004), Chandler says: "You know what? You're right. I'm sorry I even brought it up. It's just that sometimes you get me so wound up I don't know what I'm saying."
  • In the song "Wind It Up" by Gwen Stefani, she sings: "She'll be glad you're mine / You'll get hers and mine / Wind it all around".
  • In the movie "Toy Story 3" (2010), Woody says: "Buzz! Buzz! Come on! Snap out of it! You're not a Space Ranger! You're an action figure! A child's plaything! You are a toy! You can't fly! And you don't have a laser! It's just a little light bulb that blinks! How did you wind up like this?"
  • In the song "Wind Me Up, Let Me Go" by Cliff Richard, he sings: "Wind me up, let me go / You're only wasting my time / Wind me up, let me go / I've got someone else on my mind."

Synonyms: Other/Different Ways to Say "Wind Me Up"

Here are some synonyms for this idiom:

  • Annoy me
  • Bother me
  • Bug me
  • Drive me crazy
  • Irritate me
  • Mess with me
  • Piss me off
  • Push me
  • Tease me
  • Upset me

10 Frequently Asked Questions About "Wind Me Up"

Here are some frequently asked questions about this idiom:

  • What does "wind me up" mean?

The idiom "wind me up" can have different meanings depending on the context. It can mean to annoy or upset someone, to say untrue things to trick someone, or to make someone crazy, angry, or energetic.

  • What is the origin of the phrase "wind me up"?

The origin of the idiom "wind me up" is not clear, but it may be related to winding up a piece of yarn or a clock. In the past, clocks had to be wound up before they worked. One would make it run faster and louder by winding it up. Similarly, winding up a person would make them more agitated or excited.

  • What are some synonyms for "wind me up"?

Some synonyms for this idiom are "annoy me," "drive me crazy," "bug me," "drive me crazy," "piss me off," "tease me," "upset me," etc.

  • What is the difference between "wind up" and "wind down"?

"To wind up" means to increase or cause tension, excitement, or agitation. "To wind down" means to decrease or relieve stress, excitement, or agitation.

  • Is "wind me up" a British or American expression?

The idiom "wind me up" is more common in British English than American English. However, it can be understood by both speakers. Some of the synonyms listed above may be more frequently used in American English.

  • Can you use "wind me up" in a positive way?

Yes, you can use "wind me up" positively to make someone excited or energetic. For example, "The music winds me up and makes me want to dance."

  • What is the opposite of "wind me up"?

The opposite of "wind me up" depends on your meaning. If you mean to annoy or upset someone, the opposite could be "calm me down" or "soothe me." If you mean to say untrue things to trick someone, the opposite could be "tell me the truth" or "Be honest with me." If you mean to make someone crazy, angry, or energetic, the opposite could be "relax me" or "chill me out."

  • How do you use "wind me up" in a question?

You can use "wind me up" in a question by adding a question word (such as who, what, when, where, why, or how) and changing the word order if necessary. For example, "Who winds you up the most?"

  • How do you pronounce "wind me up"?

The pronunciation of "wind me up" depends on whether you use it as a verb or a noun. As a verb, it is pronounced with a short I sound, like in "win." As a noun, it is pronounced with a long I say, like in "wine." For example, "He winds me up every time he talks." vs. "He gave me a wind-up toy for my birthday."

  • What are some other idioms that use the word "wind"?

Many other idioms use the word "wind," such as "throw caution to the wind," "go like the wind," "get wind of something," and "break wind.

Final Thoughts About "Wind Me Up"

The idiom "wind me up" is a versatile and expressive phrase with different meanings depending on the context.

In summary:

  • It can mean to annoy, upset, trick, or excite someone.
  • It dates back to the 16th century and may be related to winding up a clock.
  • It can be used in various situations and contexts, as shown by the examples above.
  • It has also appeared in pop culture, such as songs, movies, and TV shows.
  • It has some synonyms and antonyms that can be used instead of it.

We encourage you to share this article on Twitter and Facebook. Just click those two links - you'll see why.

It's important to share the news to spread the truth. Most people won't.

Copyright © 2024 - U.S. Dictionary
Privacy Policy
magnifier